Welcome

Photos of Larryblakeley
http://www.royblakeley.name/larry_blakeley/larryblakeley_photos_jpeg.htm

(Contact Info: larry at larryblakeley dot com)

Important Note: You will need to click this icon to download the free needed to view most of the images on this Web site - just a couple of clicks and you're "good to go."

I manage this Web site and the following Web sites: Leslie (Blakeley) Adkins - my oldest daughter

Lori Ann Blakeley (June 20, 1985 - May 4, 2005) - my middle daughter

Evan Blakeley- my youngest child

I added the following note to the abstract of this article:

(Note: For AOL users -bless your hearts, AOL is taking such advantage of so many folks - just plug into the internet, then go to either the internet browsers, Internet Explorer, Firefox (http://www.mozilla.org), and/or you can even use Opera http://www.opera.com) - or, in fact, all of them - even at one time! If one browser freezes up with me I just open up one of the others.

In any event, instructions on how to download the plug-in viewer for DjVu is located at http://www.royblakeley.name/index.htm)

- "LizardTech Email Exchanges: DjVu Image Format," LizardTech http://www.lizardtech.com, October 22, 2004.

Directory: http://www.royblakeley.name/larry_blakeley/articles/monthly_articles

File Name: lizardtech_email_exchanges

Post Date: October 23, 2004 at 8:45 AM CDT; 1345 GMT ******************************************************************

"US authorities considered ways to communicate in the aftermath of a nuclear attack. How could any sort of 'command and control network' survive? Paul Baran, a researcher at RAND, offered a solution: design a more robust communications network using 'redundancy' and 'digital' technology.

At the time, naysayers dismissed Baran's idea as unfeasible. But working with colleagues at RAND, Baran persisted. This effort would eventually become the foundation for the World Wide Web."

- "Paul Baran and the Origins of the Internet," Rand Corporation, http://www.rand.org/about/history/baran.html

Web page: http://www.larryblakeley.com/internet_imagery.htm

Posted: October 23, 2004 at 12:40 PM CDT; 1740 GMT ******************************************************************

Have you ever had to re-type address information, possibly because you installed a new email program?

Are any of you frustrated with an email address book here, there, and everywhere?

Well, I have been, especially during times when I'm testing different email servers and client email programs.

Well, the following procedure will cover how you can use a "txt" file to record data - whether names or numbers.

Open up your favorite text editor program - i.e. Notepad.

Now, let's create a comma-delimited text file with contact information for this example. But, keep it mind we could create a file of just numerical data using the same procedure.

Type the following exactly as follows:

First Name,Last Name,Full Name,Email address (at the end of this first line, hit enter for a new line/record)

Now type some of your names and email addresses, or just copy and paste the following fictional contacts into your text editor program:

First Name,Last Name,Full Name,Email,Category
Peggy Jo,Poe,Peggy Jo Poe,Peggy Jo Poe <pjpoedesign@ascii-text.com>,Personal
George & Lorraine,Peel,George & Lorraine,George & Lorraine Peel <lorpeel42@ascii-text.com>,Business
Yvonne & Jack,Scarbrough,Yvonne & Jack Scarbrough,Yvonne & Jack Scarbrough <yvonnes.123@ascii-text.net>,Business
Anita,Noles,Anita Noles,Anita Noles <anita@ascii-text.com>,Personal
Murrel,Purkhiser, Murrel Purkhiser,Murrel Purkhiser <murrel@ascii-text.com>,Family/Friends
Roark,Barnes,Roark Barnes,Roark Barnes <roabar@ascii-text.com>,Family/Friends

Note: If you should want to add more "comma-delimited text", you may want to remove "word wrap" - if it wraps on you. Just remember that each line will be a separate "record," and each record will be separated by a HRT (hard right, carriage return for those folks from the typewriter culture).

After your finished, then save the file as a text file, then do the following:

1) make a copy of the file and save it with the three letter extension of "csv". The "csv" extension identifies this file as a "comma-delimited (or characters separated by commas) text file. Excel does not need the "csv" extension, but StarOffice seems to need it;

2) Now, the advantage of a comma-separated (or, even tab-delimited) file is that you can open it in a spreadsheet program - like Microsoft Excel or StarOffice, etc. and the program will place a column for each string of text separated in this manner. I have used this method to download data from a mainframe, save it to a text file, and then open it in Excel for data manipulation.

This may seem like a simple procedure, but as data becomes more numerous this process becomes a very powerful tool.

So, go ahead and open the file from your spreadsheet program.

The file doesn't show up? Well, you need to change the "files of type" at the bottom of the box to "all files.".

When the file opens, you may have to select which type of separator is being used - comma or tab - for the columns to be placed properly.

So, you have converted a text file to a spreadsheet file. And, you can sort to your hearts content. And, if there were numerical data, you could perform arithmetic operations with the data.

Now, you could just use a spreadsheet program without bothering with the text file. And, if you should need to convert it to a text file, then just save it in that format.

How do you use these email addresses in lieu of your "contact or address book" that is a part of your email program?

Just copy the column with the email addresses, then paste them in your new email message in the "To" field. The email program will recognize each as a separate email address and will place a comma between each one of them. And, a comma between each address designates a separate recipient to the email program.

Now, what if you do not want it to appear as a "group email?"

Well, just place your email address in the "To" field and copy the others in a "bcc" field.

This is an effective procedure for hiding email information from others. In addition, since all of your addresses are in a text file, you bypass the problems with those pesky viruses that look for your "address books" in your email programs in order to replicate itself for forwarding on to your contacts.

Directory: http://www.larryblakeley.com/products/text_creation/

File Name: comma_delimited_text.htm

Posted: October 1, 2004 at 2:15 AM CDT; 0715 GMT

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Today, October 7, 2004 - while researching some United State Census Bureau information for 1776 for an article I am working on I noticed another good example of "CSV" files for you to be aware of - so, I am inserting it here.

The Web page is at http://www.census.gov/ipc/www/usinterimproj/

On this page you will see the following file formats: Excel (Microsoft spreadsheet); PDF (Adobe's product for including all the fonts, images, etc. in a portable document for distribution to others and, particularly, printing purposes); and CSV (comma separated values - the important point to add here is that CSV is universal - in other words, a CSV formatted file can be opened by any text editor program, and most all spreadsheet programs. You do not have to use Microsoft - unless, you prefer to. In fact, I use a Linux desktop addition operating system on one of several computers in front of me - and, Sun's OpenOffice.org's suite of document processing and spreadsheet programs is absolutely "free", and I can manipulate data in its spreadsheet just as I can manipulate the same data in Microsoft's Excel program. Now, granted Excel is an excellent product and, most likely, may have more bells and whistles - but, most of us just don't need these higher level features - so, why pay this, when you can get it for "free?" I would like to hear a legitimate reason for doing this. And, another concept to keep in mind, here, is that many mainstream programs are becoming "commodities," but they are not going to disclose that fact to you and miss a sale - you're on your own, unless you are reading the words on my website disclosing this fact to you for consideration going forward.

End of October 7, 2004 insert

So, file size is important, in particular when viewed from the perspective of communicating over the internet. And, wait until you start storing and sharing your digital images! These files can get really large! In fact, this is why I use the DjVu format for imaging - the resolution quality is very good, with 1/10th the file size of JPEG. Smaller file size equates to faster access, less storage space, and less bandwidth.

Don't believe me?

OK, I'll show you - go to this directory:

http://www.larryblakeley/products/text_creation

and look at the image file:

zeus_total_bytes20040929.png

(updated from website_comparison_bytes20040912.jpg)

- a visual representation of usage in "total bytes" over the 24-hour period stated. The websites that I want you to look at are www.royblakeley.name and www.larryblakeley.com.

Now, compare that image with the "total hits" image file:

zeus_total_hits20040929.png

(updated from website_comparison_hits20040912.jpg)

for the same time period.

The total hits are virtually the same, but my father's website served up approximately 20x more bytes per hit.

Why is that? Because his website is predominately scanned images right now. So, if they had been in JPEG you can anticipate 10 times more bandwidth required for the same image. And, the larger the file the slower the download - which to you means you are left staring at your computer monitor - just waiting, and we all hate waiting! Don't we? So, with the assumption on my part that others hate to wait too, I have purposely designed both of these websites with "high speed" and "reduced storage usage" as an objective for measuring these projects of mine.

Oh, one other thing - if you would spread the word about these websites both of these numbers will go up. And, the Zeus web server will just keep humming away on top of the Linux server. Don't believe me? Well, just go ahead and try and "make my day."

OK, you are now making my days. I have updated the image files above to reflect your interest. And, what I am most pleased with is that you are using DjVu to view the photographs. So, you are learning about something that I hope will mean something to you.

Directory: http://www.larryblakeley.com/products/text_creation/
File Name: office_suites.htm
Posted September 29, 2004 at 12:30 PM CDT; 1730 GMT

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Convert from PDF to Text/HTML

Directory: http://www.larryblakeley.com/products/text_creation/

File Name: pdf_to_txt_html

1. Browse to Adobe's "free" PDF to Text conversion tool at this location: http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/access_simple_form.html

2. Enter the URL where your article is stored:

3. Save the "HTML" document that is in your web browser to your desktop, as follows:

Select File>Save As

Give it a file name and make sure you are saving to your desktop, so you can find it. If you become confused where you saved the file (and, you remember the file name), then go to Start>Search>All files and folders>then type the file name

Remember: the * character is a "wild-card" and comes in very handy for searches when you don't know the name exactly, or even the 3-letter extension - practice looking for some files and get accustomed to the power of searching, instead of spending time "looking" through directories for "lost" files.

4. If you want to convert it to a text document just open the file, use right-click, choose, select all, right-click again, select copy, then open up your text editor program (i.e. Notepad), right-click again, and select paste. Then save the file as text - you will now have both, an "HTML" and "TXT" version of the same document.

Posted: September 26, 2004 at 1:05 PM CDT; 1805 GMT

Here are my results of file size of the same file (http://www.larryblakeley.com/products/text_creation/ - look for file name dan_baum... to see the file size numbers for yourself) saved in the following programs using the same font (Arial), size (12 point), and with no noticeable difference to me upon printout of each. I moved the text directly from the basic text editors to the others: Microsoft's NotePad, NoteTab Pro, WordPerfect, Word, and StarOffice 7:

StarOffice 7 - 20KB

NoteTab Pro, Microsoft's NotePad (and HTML) - 34KB

WordPerfect 12 - 48KB

Word 2003 - 67KB

Another item that seemed odd to me - the word count for the same document was 5,770 in WordPerfect and 5,766 in Word. I did not look for an answer to this.

What does this mean? Well, when I look at these numbers from the perspective of storage issues, a couple of items of interest to make you aware of: a Microsoft Word file will require 3-1/2 times more storage space than StarOffice 7 and twice as much as the text editors (including HTML).

But, storage is much cheaper today, right? Well, it is, and it isn't. How's that? Well, if you are going to maintain documents in a environment that provides ready access, then you have to start adding additional storage devices, increasing your costs and complexity, along with the technical expertise required to handle it. You are going from simple to complex.

There's several other problems that need to be considered - proprietary software coding that stands a good chance of becoming obsolete over the years - regardless of whether it is due to hardware or software related issues.

And, furthermore I don't believe there is anyone that can predict what is going to happen in the area of bandwidth usage over the internet. As multi-media becomes more centered around the computer there will be much more demand (and need) for increased bandwidth traveling to your home and your neighbor's home. Today, most ISP's figure you are not going to be continuously using bandwidth throughout the 24-hour day - just periodically throughout this period of time - a little bit of surfing and checking email. What does that mean for them? Well, it means one of two things - this is bandwidth they do not have to pay for themselves, or it's bandwidth they have already paid for and they use it for other purposes in order to cover their cost. If they don't, then they have to shut their doors - and, you are left looking for another ISP. So, in a way they are counting on this "unused" bandwidth as part of their business plan. That's a significant reason why ISP's don't like heavy usage of peer-to-peer file sharing. It really eats into this "unused" bandwidth estimate of theirs. Will they starting gauging your bandwidth usage and charge you for it? Will they go up on their pricing? I don't know, but I do know that ultimately every business must make a profit in order to continue to provide a product or service.

So, file size is important, in particular when viewed from the perspective of communicating over the internet. And, wait until you start storing and sharing your digital images! These files can get really large! In fact, this is why I use the DjVu format for imaging - the resolution quality is very good, with 1/10th the file size of JPEG. Smaller file size equates to faster access, less storage space, and less bandwidth.

Don't believe me? OK, I'll show you - go to this directory - http://www.larryblakeley/products/text_creation and look at the image file, website_comparison_bytes20040912.jpg - a visual representation of usage in "total bytes" over the 24-hour period stated. The websites that I want you to look at are www.royblakeley.name and www.larryblakeley.com.

Now, compare that image with the "total hits" image file website_comparison_hits20040912.jpg for the same time period.

The total hits are virtually the same, but my father's website served up approximately 7 times more bytes per hit.

Why is that? Because his website is predominately scanned images right now. So, if they had been in JPEG you can anticipate 10 times more bandwidth required for the same image. And, the larger the file the slower the download - which to you means you are left staring at your computer monitor - just waiting, and we all hate waiting! Don't we? So, with the assumption on my part that others hate to wait too, I have purposely designed both of these websites with "high speed" and "reduced storage usage" as an objective for measuring these projects of mine.

Oh, one other thing - if you would spread the word about these websites both of these numbers will go up. And, the Zeus web server will just keep humming away on top of the Linux server. Don't believe me? Well, just go ahead and try and "make my day."

Note: details on scanning is not a part of text creation - and, will be covered for you, as I take you around the information management process - one step at a time.

Posted September 12, 2004 at 11:10 AM CDT; 1610 GMT

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Before going any further with your pursuit to learn what I have presented so far make sure that you think about the above article from 2 perspectives - technical, of course, but from a humanitarian lens of understanding as well.

In particular, what was the driving force of Tim Berners-Lee? What was his vision? What did he want in return from all of his efforts to make his vision a reality?

Why is this so important for you and me? Because, I think most of us can agree on one point here - contribution to society and mankind is a much higher calling than the self. And, there are many amongst our society that are in a position to give much more to humankind. Why do they not realize this until just before their final destination, or "greater reward." So far, you will not find this calling in Bill Gates/Microsoft and many other companies that are focused only on profits. Sure, they contribute a lot of money to charities, etc., but have they made their products available to the less fortunate, to third-world countries? Ok, so what's the problem with profit-making? Absolutely, nothing. But, when the weapon of choice to maintain this position requires you to convince people that they need something of yours when actually they don't - in my book of code of conduct, this is without question to me, the blatant use of deceit and lies in order to dupe you and me. And, quite frankly I don't appreciate being treated as a second-class citizen that doesn't have the sense of mind to figure this out.

And, most importantly we should learn at least just enough to be capable to recognize motives of others that are not in our best interests.

Besides, it was us who created Bill Gates' empire of wealth. We all were convinced to believe that we could not do without their products in order to be productive.

So, this article belongs on both sides - this website and my father's website. I hope you understand why I have created each of them for you and what is stressed in each.

http://www.larryblakeley.com/products/text_creation/office_suites.htm

Post Date: September 11, 2004 at 1:00 PM CDT; 1800 GMT

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Information about folders and files that are accessed over the internet and the world wide web. http://www.larryblakeley.com/products/text_creation/folders_files_internet_web.htm

Post Date: September 11, 2004 at 9:00 AM CDT; 1400 GMT

http://www.larryblakeley.com/products/text_creation/office_suites.htm

What text creation program can I use that can be read by most every computer and will give me some comfort that my digital information saved to a file can be opened by computers 10 years from now?

One that assigns those numeric values to letters, numbers, punctuation marks and other codes, such as a control code, as represented in the "American Standard Code for Information Interchange" (ASCII). This was invented by Robert W. Bemer and approved by the American National Standards Institute in 1963. http://www.larryblakeley.com/some_computer_history.htm

Without this standardization there would be no common denominator for computers to understand the "computer language of '0's and 1's'" that deviate from this table of values. This is why "standardization" is so important. Without it, you may possibly not be able to view this webpage, or view the text in emails.

In fact - try this. With your mouse cursor in the box for the Web page display, click your right mouse key, then go down to select "View Source."

Several things here - it opened up in "Notepad" text editor that comes with Windows and you will see all the text I wrote to create this page, plus (among other markup language) the following that I want to bring to your attention:

- some bracketing that I have used, such as <p align="left" class="style1" style="line-height: 150%"> at the beginning of each sentence and then ended it with a </p> in order to separate the lines using 1-1/2 spacing for better viewing by those of us with deteriorating eyesight; and

- some other bracketing used for creating the underlined "hyperlinks" that you click on with your mouse key to surf the web <a href="http://www.larryblakeley.com/Articles/interviews/neil_beagrie20040208.htm>"

The bracketing is markup of the document in "HTML" language and outside the bracketing is nothing more that typed text, encoded in the standard ASCII coding (remember from reading the article about the internet and the world wide web that I recommended you read? And, noted that it was important - Ok, maybe some of you fudged a little and need to go back. To "teach" I have to have a plan of presentation. This plan, I believe will enable you to "learn" in an order that I believe is understandable to most (yes, even those that say "I just don't know anything about this contraption?" And, ... 'can't learn this!' " - I say "You are fully capable of learning just enough that 'you need to know' in order to keep you out of trouble in the digital age. And, besides - I will make it as painless as I possibly can for you."

Ok, now close out of Notepad and do this - right click the mouse button, go to "Select All." The entire page should be highlighted. Now, click the right mouse key again and select "copy" from the menu that opened; go to "Start," then "All Programs," up to "Accessories," down to "Notepad," then "right click" and select "Pin to Start menu." Now, you can find your "Notepad" much easier by "Start" and up to "Notepad." So, select "Notepad" to open a blank file, then use the "right click mouse button," and select "paste" from the drop-down menu.

Now, look at the results on the page. All of the coding within the brackets did not copy over. Why? Because the text editor "Notepad" is only ASCII- based and does not recognize "HTML" coding. However, all of the text outside the bracketing remained - and, some of this text is where I typed the URL's again outside of the brackets so it would not disappear. I can retain a record of the URL's, use it for this demonstration, and for some other purposes on my agenda for future teaching.

Now, try this. Highlight one of my URL's typed (starting with the "http:" and ending with the "htm," or sometimes you will see "html"), and right click to select "copy," then go to the address bar of your browser, highlight the URL already in the address bar, then right-click and select "Paste." Then either hit your Enter key, or the "Go" arrow to the right of the address bar. It will take you to the webpage.

By going through the above several times the article about the internet and world wide web should make more sense to you. If it does not then go back and read it. Then come back here and go through the process several times to get it down.

Why do I need to know this? Because the internet and the web will become more and more the channel of communication than it already has become. We have only seen the tip of the iceberg. In fact, every time you typed an email message and send it to someone - it's being typed in ASCII for the most part and transmitted across the internet to its destination. In fact, you could type you message in Notepad, save it, and send it as an attachment. By doing so, your file is kept outside of another problem area - managing the massive amount of email.

Post Date: September 10, 2004 at 12:45 PM CDT; 1745 GMT

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"Despite all of these perfectly functional technologies, the Internet was fraught with incompatibilities, as data was stored in a myriad of often-incompatible formats and the usage of protocols was inconsistent across different platforms. Tim Berners-Lee invented the Web in part to resolve these incompatibilities, relying on a small set of simple protocols to share data in a platform-independent manner. This is the story of the Web." - "The World Wide Web as an Engineering Paradigm," Matthew Lee, Andrew Montgomery, Steven Shapiro, Veeral Shah, Qian Wang, December 15, 2000.

HTML Summary (7,150 words)

http://www.larryblakeley.com/Articles/monthly_articles/engineering_paradigm_www_summary.htm

Full Text (12,500 words)

http://www.larryblakeley.com/Articles/monthly_articles/engineering_paradigm_www20001215.txt

PDF (12,500 words)

http://www.larryblakeley.com/Articles/monthly_articles/engineering_paradigm_www20001215.pdf

Post Date: August 29, 2004 10:30 PM CDT; August 30, 2004 0330 GMT

http://www.larryblakeley.com/document_creation.htm

Data Creation

Database

Oil and Gas Asset Management visual pictorial

DjVu format (9 KB file size)

- I prefer that you use the DjVu viewer - it's much more browser friendly, plus it is a recommended format for scanning.

http://www.larryblakeley.com/products/data_creation/oil_gas_database.djvu

- click on this icon to go to the webpage with another identical icon for getting the DjVu viewer, plus a hyperlink for a continuation of teaching document creation by imaging, then try some of the photos on that website for outstanding, clear photographs (except on very old photos, of course). Remember to play with the zoom controls, etc. to get a good feel for DjVu capabilities.

http://www.royblakeley.name/

PDF format (53 KB file size)

http://www.larryblakeley.com/products/data_creation/oil_gas_database.pd

- click on this icon to get the PDF viewer

http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/readstep2.html

Post Date: August 24, 2004 at 2:00 PM CDT; 1900 GMT

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August 20, 2004 Beginning point. http://www.larryblakeley.com/products/text_creation/office_suites.htm

(Note: this is for me, so I know when where to start from later - Remember, "Rome wasn't built in a day!" Besides you need to read this article.)

Question: What do I need to know at the "creation" stage of a digital text document?

My answer: When you put down your pen and paper, type a letter in this case using a computer and keyboard to enter the digital (or possibly more accurate, electronic) world to do the same thing.

Answer: Nothing that you probably want to know about.

Question: What about if I print it out - what then?

Answer: Still the same.

Now, you probably think that's not funny, so you ask -

Question: What if I want to save this letter in digital format for later use?

Answer: How long do you want to keep it? How important is it to you? I mean, what if it just disappeared into "thin air"?

You see - if you don't really care if it should somehow disappear between computer restarts, then all you need to do is to use a word processing software program that does what you need (or want) for it to do at a price you're willing to pay.

Simple. You don't need to be at this website for the most part.

For anything else, you at least need to read this article before going any further:

"Digital Information Will Never Survive by Accident”, Interview by SAF Info (http://www.sap.info) of Neil Beagrie, British Library and Joint Information Systems Committee Partnership Manager at the British Library, February 8, 2004 http://www.sap.info/public/en/printout.php4/article/Article-3089140c577c931a92/en

August 20, 2004 Ending point.